• Fashion + Disability

    Disability Visibility in Fashion: Platforms not Pedestals

    Disabled people remain the most underrepresented minority in media. This includes disability (in)visibility in fashion. Retailers seem obsessed with over-representing ‘perfect’ bodies. Disabled consumers scroll through Instagram and can’t relate to mainstream brands. Many manufacture clothing that disabled people can wear, however we don’t see this reflected throughout their marketing strategies. Dishonest representation is harmful Homogeneous representations continue to saturate fashion marketing, alienating disabled people. They are led to believe those clothes aren’t made for them. Social media hasn’t exactly helped; now rooted in contemporary fashion culture, its ubiquity can be damaging to many disabled and non-disabled consumers. Particularly young women. Regular online interaction has maintained ideas of the body…

  • Fashion + Mental Health

    The Mental Well-being of Fashion Creatives

    Fashion has long prided itself on being a creative and innovative art form. Yet, in the past few decades these two foundations have started to evaporate. It has transitioned into a hyperactive industry. Not only has this impacted consumer mental health, but it has also caused detriment to those working within. Its fast-paced and relentless nature tends to stifle the originality and inventiveness of its creatives, negatively impacting upon their mental well-being. The work culture of these brands is intense. The industry expects employees to eat, sleep, and breath all of its facets. From weekend exhibitions to monthly international supplier meetings, there appears to be a large overlap between personal…

  • Fashion + Diversity

    Diversity AND Inclusion

    These days, when brands fail to acknowledge, respect, and represent different groups and cultures it can cause detrimental “viral outrage”. And rightly so. Customers are no longer passive consumers. We are demanding a more honest representation of society that looks beyond westernised beauty standards. We are asking for diversity. Our new dialogue between brand managers has amplified feedback on a worldwide platform which is impossible to ignore. We are democratising fashion. We are demanding diversity AND inclusion. Indeed, this has initiated a more diverse market, industry practice, and regimes of representation. Many runways now include a range of sizes, ages, identities, and ethnicities, evident in Christian Sirano’s most recent catwalk.…

  • Fashion + Psychology

    Re-imagining Disability through Adaptive Fashion

    Disability and mainstream fashion have long been mutually exclusive entities. The industry has largely ignored this consumer group. Retailers today continue to mass-produce clothing with one person in mind: the white, size 8, non-disabled female. Many mainstream brands thoughtlessly saturate the market with garment designs that create dressing difficulties for many. Even clothing that’s suitable for a disabled person is advertised on a non-disabled model whose features fit westernised beauty standards. Therefore, disabled people are still having to actively source desired clothing in a marketplace not structured with their wants and needs in mind. Nevertheless, adaptive wear is here to re-imagine disability in fashion! Adaptive fashion is here to help…